Association for Consumer Research

ACR-Sheth Foundation Long-Term Contribution In Consumer Research Award

About the Award

This award is presented once every three years to honor the long-term contribution of an article that has had the greatest impact on the discipline.   Each winner receives a plaque and a financial award funded by the Sheth Foundation.  The award goes to the article that has made the most significant impact on consumer behavior and must have been published at least ten years ago. The ACR-Sheth Foundation Long-Term Contribution Award was first awarded in 2002. This award is presented once every three years to honor the long-term contribution of an article that has had the greatest impact on the discipline.

2023 Recipient

"The Behavioral Consequences of Service Quality"
(1996), Journal of Marketing 60, no. 2

Valaire Zeithaml, Leonard Berry, and A. Parasuraman

Past Long-Term Contribution Award Winners

2020

Friestad, M., & Wright, P. (1994). The persuasion knowledge model: How people cope with persuasion attempts. Journal of Consumer Research, 21(1).

Marian Friestad and Peter Wright

2017

Holbrook, M. B., & Hirschman, E. C. (1982). The experiential aspects of consumption: Consumer fantasies, feelings, and fun. Journal of Consumer Research, 9(3).

Morris B Holbrook and Elizabeth C Hirschman

2014

Muniz, A. M., & O’Guinn, T.C. (2001). Brand Community, Journal of Consumer Research, 27 (4).

Albert M. Muniz, Jr. and Thomas C. O’Guinn

2011

Fournier, S. (1998). Consumers and their brands: Developing relationship theory in consumer research. Journal of Consumer Research, 24(4).

Susan Fournier

2008

Alba, J. W., & Hutchinson, J. W. (1987). Dimensions of consumer expertise. Journal of Consumer Research, 13(4).

Joseph Alba and Wesley J. Hutchinson

2005

Belk, R. W. (1988). Possessions and the extended self. Journal of Consumer Research, 15(2).

Russell Belk

2002

Huber, J., Payne, J. W., & Puto, C. (1982). Adding asymmetrically dominated alternatives: Violations of regularity and the similarity hypothesis. Journal of Consumer Research, 9(2).

Joel Huber, John Payne and Chris Puto